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Accessible facility for persons with disabilities unveiled in ACT

changing places toilet facilities

The Albanese Labor Government is working with the ACT Government to deliver on its commitment for more specialised disability toilet facilities in the ACT.

The Commonwealth is contributing a third of the total build cost of $274,000 to the ACT Government for the delivery of a second Changing Places facility in the territory.

It’s one of a number of Changing Places being built across Australia to ensure people with disability can participate in their communities with comfort and confidence.

Changing Places facilities are larger than standard accessible toilets and have extra features designed for people with disability with high support needs and their carers.

These facilities make community spaces and events more accessible and allow people with disability with high support needs to take part in community life without being limited by concerns of not having adequate facilities available to them.

The Commonwealth Government funding contribution to the ACT facility is part of the Albanese Government’s election commitment of $32.2 million over four years, for new Changing Places in Local Government Areas currently without a Changing Places facility.

Minister for Social Services Amanda Rishworth said the Commonwealth funding, which is approximately one third of the total build cost, will improve community accessibility in the ACT.

“We want all Australians with disability to be out and about in their community and enjoying their lives with confidence that they can access the facilities they need,” Minister Rishworth said.

“Improving local facilities to meet the specialised needs of people with disability helps empower them to fully participate in community life, and helps us create a more inclusive Australia.

“We are proud to contribute to this new ACT Changing Place, representing another Local Government Area in Australia in which we will co-fund these essential facilities.”

Minister for the National Disability Insurance Scheme Bill Shorten said accessibility was about respect and human rights.

“When we are talking about equal and full participation in the community, or about accessible tourism, it’s vital we consider the basic needs of people with disability,” Minister Shorten said.

“It’s not good enough when there are no appropriate toilet options available for people with high support needs.

“With the Government’s funding for new Changing Places in the ACT and across Australia, we are working to address these gaps and ensure greater inclusion and accessibility for Australians with disability in a range of settings.”

ACT Minister for Disability, Justice Health, Mental Health, Seniors and Veterans Emma Davidson said the addition of the Changing Place in Woden was important for the ACT disability community.

“We must aim to eliminate all accessibility barriers to public facilities, transport systems and communication technologies.

“The new accessible facility in Woden is very much welcome but we know more needs to be done to meet people’s needs, and we’ll keep working on meeting those needs.

“This is just one step of many being taken in the ACT to improve the lives of people with disability,” Minister Davidson said.

For more information about Changing Places facilities, visit changingplaces.org.au.

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