Top of page
Health

Researchers reveal mechanism that causes irritable bowel syndrome

Young man with a stomach pain

KU Leuven researchers have identified the biological mechanism that describes why some people experience abdominal pain when eating certain foods.

The finding paves the way for more efficient treatment of irritable bowel syndrome and other food intolerances. The study, carried out in mice and humans, was published in Nature.

Up to 20% of the world’s population suffers from irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), which causes stomach pain or severe discomfort after eating. This affects their quality of life. Gluten-free and other diets can provide some relief, but this works a mystery since the patients are not allergic to the foods in question, nor do they have known conditions such as coeliac disease.

“Very often, these patients are not taken seriously by physicians, and the lack of an allergic response is used as an argument that this is all in mind, and that they don’t have a problem with their gut physiology,” says Professor Guy Boeckxstaens, a gastroenterologist at KU Leuven and lead author of the new research. “With these new insights, we provide further evidence that we are dealing with a real disease.”

In a healthy intestine, the immune system does not react to foods, so the first step was to determine what might cause this tolerance to breaking down. Since people with IBS often report that their symptoms began after a gastrointestinal infection, such as food poisoning, the researchers started with the idea that an infection. In contrast, a particular food is present in the gut, which might sensitize the food’s immune system.

They infected mice with a stomach bug, and at the same time, fed them ovalbumin, a protein found in egg white that is commonly used in experiments as a model food antigen. An antigen is any molecule that provokes an immune response. Once the infection cleared, the mice were given ovalbumin again to see if their immune systems had become sensitized to it. The results were affirmative: the ovalbumin on its own provoked mast cell activation, histamine release, and digestive intolerance with increased abdominal pain. This was not the case in mice that had not been infected with the bug and received ovalbumin.

The researchers were then able to unpick the series of events in the immune response that connected the ingestion of ovalbumin to activation of the mast cells. Significantly, this immune response only occurred in the part of the intestine infected by disruptive bacteria. It did not produce more general symptoms of a food allergy.

You might also like

young-man-with-hearing-aid

One in four people projected to have hearing problems by 2050, WHO report

Nearly 2.5 billion people worldwide ─ or one in four…

Machine Deep learning algorithms, Artificial intelligence AI , Automation and modern technology in business as concept

Machine learning to identify autism blood biomarkers, study finds

Using machine learning tools to analyze hundreds of proteins, UT…

Closeup of Doctor checking man patient arterial blood pressure on the working room in clinic.

Specialized clinic helps adults with autism receive preventive services

Research led by The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center and College of…

boy working on a jigsaw puzzle

Brain action can reveal the severity of autistic traits

A team of researchers from Russia and Israel applied a…