Top of page
Sports

Paris 2024 launches Paralympic sport emojis

Paralympic sports emojis
Photo: Paris 2024

Paris 2024 is taking action for a wider, more inclusive representation of sport by launching Paralympic sports to the emoji dictionary, which has become a universal language.

Paris 2024 hopes to foster a more inclusive representation of sport and raise the profile of the Paralympic Games around the world.

For many years now, emojis have become ever-more conscious of diversity. From a full spectrum of skin and hair colour to people with disabilities, these small emoticons – now an integral part of how we communicate day-to-day – increasingly reflect modern society.

However, there is one fight still to face – the representation of diversity in sport. Paris 2024 strongly believes that sport is an exceptional driver of inclusion, self-acceptance and recognition of difference. Sport is not only for people of any particular physique; some of the world’s greatest champions live with disabilities.

Paris 2024 has decided to build on the series of initiatives it has already undertaken and launch a campaign backed by the IPC and the CPSF to add Paralympic sports to the emoji dictionary.

These efforts further substantiate Paris 2024’s desire to treat the Paralympic Games with the same driving ambition as the Olympic Games, as it did when it became the first Organising Committee to choose a single emblem for both competitions.

You might also like

Athletic men with artificial bionic legs playing soccer at the stadium Athletic men with artificial bionic legs playing soccer at the stadium

Seeking innovative solutions to empower persons with disabilities in sports

Innovative small-to-medium sized businesses are being encouraged to develop new…

Close-up disabled man holding basketball Close-up disabled man holding basketball

Qualtrough announces funding to boost sports participation by removing barriers

Sport has the power to help build stronger and healthier…

a photo of network members Melissa Hale (left) and Jessi Hooper (right) facilitating a Building Inclusive Sport Clubs workshop in a meeting room. Melissa is standing and speaking holding notes and a pen. Jessi is sitting, listening and smiling. Behind the two is a television screen with a presentation. a photo of network members Melissa Hale (left) and Jessi Hooper (right) facilitating a Building Inclusive Sport Clubs workshop in a meeting room. Melissa is standing and speaking holding notes and a pen. Jessi is sitting, listening and smiling. Behind the two is a television screen with a presentation.

New network aims to empower women with disabilities in sports leadership

Disability Sports Australia and Victoria University, Melbourne have launched the…

woman in electronic wheelchair geeting out from the building woman in electronic wheelchair geeting out from the building

Spain’s San Cristóbal wins EU Access City Award 2024 for accessibility

The Spanish city of San Cristóbal de La Laguna has won the…