Top of page
Health

Exercise could slow withering effects of Alzheimer’s

Dallas – Exercising several times a week may delay brain deterioration in people at high risk for Alzheimer’s disease, according to a study that scientists say merits further research to establish whether fitness can affect the progression of dementia.

Research from UT Southwestern found that people who had accumulation of amyloid beta in the brain – a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease – experienced slower degeneration in a region of the brain crucial for memory if they exercised regularly for one year.

Although exercise did not prevent the eventual spread of toxic amyloid plaques blamed for killing neurons in the brains of dementia patients, the findings suggest an intriguing possibility that aerobic workouts can at least slow down the effects of the disease if intervention occurs in the early stages.

“What are you supposed to do if you have amyloid clumping together in the brain? Right now doctors can’t prescribe anything,” said Dr. Rong Zhang, who led the clinical trial that included 70 participants ages 55 and older. “If these findings can be replicated in a larger trial, then maybe one day doctors will be telling high-risk patients to start an exercise plan. In fact, there’s no harm in doing so now.”

The study published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease compared cognitive function and brain volume between two groups of sedentary older adults with memory issues: One group did aerobic exercise (at least a half-hour workout four to five times weekly), and another group did only flexibility training.

 

You might also like

Woman silhouette with sun and clouds in her head Woman silhouette with sun and clouds in her head

Applications open for Diverse Communities Mental Health and Wellbeing Grants

Applications are now open for round two of the Diverse…

Close up of taking sample for coronavirus testing Close up of taking sample for coronavirus testing

Free RAT program for eligible Victorians with disability extended

The free rapid antigen tests program for eligible Victorians with…

The Yang-Tan Institute of Employment and Disability has joined a multi-institution team that has received a $5 million grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to help create better job outcomes for people with autism. The Yang-Tan Institute of Employment and Disability has joined a multi-institution team that has received a $5 million grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to help create better job outcomes for people with autism.

Research shows AI can improve stroke diagnostics

A new study presented on Thursday at the Society of…

Doctor with nurse putting broken leg of old man in plaster Doctor with nurse putting broken leg of old man in plaster

ICRC program provides physical rehabilitation services

Over 3,000 persons with disabilities have benefited from physical rehabilitation…