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Ensuring better deal for Queenslanders with disabilities

Disabled woman in wheelchair with assistant walking in garden

The Queensland Government has pledged to negotiate a fair deal for Queenslanders with disabilities as part of funding arrangements with the Commonwealth.

The Disability Reform Ministerial Council (DRMC) met in Canberra today to continue efforts to improve the lives of people with disability inside and outside the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS).

Queensland’s Minister for Disability Services Charis Mullen joined other state and territory ministers who agreed to priority areas of reform following recommendations from the Disability Royal Commission and the NDIS Review.

The immediate focus will be the development and design of a national foundational supports strategy to ensure all people with disability can access the right support when they need it.

Queensland will also take a cohesive approach to disability reform, given the significant overlap of recommendations from both inquiries.

Queenslanders with disability and other key stakeholders will be invited to have their say on proposed disability reforms at a roundtable next month.

The roundtable will discuss what key outcomes are needed, what reforms need to be prioritised, and how the Queensland Government and the disability community can work together most effectively to develop and implement the changes.

The roundtable will include people with lived experience of disability, sector stakeholders, peak bodies and advocacy groups, ensuring the voices of people with disability are at the centre of any decisions.

Quotes attributable to Minister for Disability Services Charis Mullen said: “We will always fight for better outcomes for Queenslanders with disability, their carers, families and the wider sector.

“It’s critical that we get the design of the foundational support system right, so Queenslanders with disability can access the supports they need when they choose.

“Any changes to the NDIS also need to be carefully planned to make sure people with disability have ongoing access to the supports they need.

“I know Queenslanders with disability, their family members and carers, are the experts of their own lives.

“That’s why we’ll always ensure voices of people with disability and the disability sector are at the centre of any decision-making processes.

“We value this lived experience and we will work alongside Queensland’s disability community to create a more inclusive and accessible state.”

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