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UK responds to safeguarding disabled children review

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The recent national review  in the UK delving into the harm and abuse suffered by over 100 children with complex health needs and disabilities in residential settings in Doncaster emphasized the crucial necessity of amplifying the voices of these children. The review unequivocally outlined the imperative changes required in provision, commissioning, and regulation to effectively address their needs.

In response to our recommendations, the Secretary of State for Education and the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care have jointly released a comprehensive plan of action. The collaboration between these departments, along with active involvement from children, families, local authorities, integrated care boards, regulators, and residential care providers, is pivotal in implementing the essential changes needed to ensure the safety of children.

The media statement expresses appreciation for the government’s communication via letters to commissioners, providers, and regulators, articulating expectations for the tasks they are now tasked to undertake. It underscores the significance of robust and effective leadership across all these sectors, emphasizing that its importance cannot be underestimated.

“We support government’s aspirations to address some of the system problems identified in our review, though it is disappointing that 7 of our 9 recommendations are accepted in principle only.  The proposed six-month review of progress will therefore be important in evaluating how well change is achieved.”

“It is vital that the proposed changes enable parents and children to be assured that, wherever their children are living, they receive the highest quality care and protection.  We look forward to our continued engagement with government and all stakeholders to bring about the required transformation in how agencies work with children with disabilities and complex health needs, and their families to thrive and enjoy their lives.” according to the media statement.

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