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Consultation to begin in Australia for Banking Accessibility Standards review

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The Australian Banking Association (ABA) has engaged the Australian Network on Disability (AND) to undertake a review of the ABA Accessibility Principles for Banking Services.

The review will help ensure the banking sector is accessible and inclusive during these times of rapid technological change.

AND will seek submissions and consult with a range of key stakeholder groups.

ABA’s Chief Executive Officer Anna Bligh said the review seeks to recognise the diversity of customer needs and perspectives, and to ensure electronic products, processes and service design are inclusive, flexible and straightforward.

“The project will amplify the voices of people with disability and carers, acknowledging their expertise in identifying what is important to maintain accessibility of financial services in the changing technological landscape.” said ABA CEO, Anna Bligh

“Banking is evolving as consumer habits change and technology advances rapidly,” Ms Bligh said.

“While these advances bring great innovation and convenience, it is important to ensure that banking is inclusive and accessible for all sectors of society. The Accessibility Principles for Banking Services provide a strong framework. This review will ensure the guidelines are up-to-date and in line with recent developments.”

Ms Bligh said artificial intelligence and digital identification were among the areas where there have been rapid advances in recent years.

“We are eager to hear what is working well, what people’s preferences are, what needs improvement and what else will help ensure everyone has accessible access banking.”

Australian Network on Disability Chief Executive Officer Corene Strauss said the group is proud to be undertaking the review.

“This is about engaging with the entire banking ecosystem in order to ensure the accessibility of the sector’s services are best serving our diverse community now, and into the future.” said ABA CEO, Anna Bligh

“We are pleased the ABA and major banks are investing in this important work and we’re proud to be leading this project recognising the criticality of access to financial services for customers’ quality of life, self-esteem, independence and autonomy to participate in society,” Ms Strauss said.

“The project will amplify the voices of people with disability and carers, acknowledging their expertise in identifying what is important to maintain accessibility of financial services in the changing technological landscape.”

Other key current issues for discussion include the increasingly complex and sophisticated scam and cyber threat environment, digital authentication tools and product design.

The review will seek input from the disability sector, government agencies, banks and the technology sector, Ms Bligh said.

“This is about engaging with the entire banking ecosystem in order to ensure the accessibility of the sector’s services are best serving our diverse community now, and into the future.”

AND is seeking feedback from people with disability, carers and advocates through an online survey open until Friday 31 March. Access the survey.

If you require the survey in an alternate format or if you would like to hear more about the project, please contact Hayley Brooks, Australian Network on Disability on 02 8270 9209 or hayley.brooks@and.org.au

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