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National Relay Service user experience research and survey findings released

NRS Survey Finding SL youtube video screenshot

The survey allowed the NRS to monitor improvements to the User Experience following several initiatives that have been undertaken, based on previous surveys in February 2021 and February 2022.

Read the NRS User Experience Research Learnings or, watch the video below.

The number of users providing feedback has increased.

NRS users continue to have a positive experience with the service.

Ongoing NRS Helpdesk feedback will be collected from the Contact Helpdesk Feedback Form.

If you have feedback about the NRS you can reach out to the NRS Helpdesk. There are a number of ways to contact Helpdesk staff (8am to 6pm, Monday to Friday EST):

  • Phone—1800 555 660
  • TTY—1800 555 630
  • Fax—1800 555 690
  • SMS—0416 001 350
  • Online—Online form
  • Email—helpdesk@relayservice.com.au
  • Post—PO BOX 99, Mount Clear, VIC 3350
  • Contact the NRS through your preferred call channel and ask for 1800 555 660

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