Top of page
Technology

Snapchat launches new lens for users to learn American Sign Language

ASL Alphabet app screenshot

Snapchat has introduced a new lens that teaches American Sign Language (ASL), in partnership with SignAll, which designs AI technology for sign language translation.

The ASL Alphabet Lens teaches you how to fingerspell your name, practice the ASL alphabet, and play games to test your skills, all using hand-tracking technology.

A team of engineers with hearing disabilities known as the “Deafengers” has spearheaded a Snapchat feature to bridge the divide between the deaf and hearing worlds.

According to a social media company, the three new augmented reality-enabled lenses encouraging Snapchat users to fingerspell in ASL debuted in September during the International Week of the Deaf.

“For native signers, in a world where linguistic inequity is prevalent, we believe AR can help evolve the way we communicate, We look forward to learning more from our community as we strive to continuously improve experiences for everyone on Snapchat.” according to a news release by the social media company.

You might also like

A person in a wheelchair speaking during a training session with another person seated next to them on the left. A person in a wheelchair speaking during a training session with another person seated next to them on the left.

UNESCO's drive for improve disability inclusion and information accessibility

UNESCO, in collaboration with the Cambodian Disabled Peoples Organization (CDPO)…

wheelchair user entering the building wheelchair user entering the building

ICC Sydney unveils Disability Inclusion Action Plan

International Convention Centre Sydney (ICC Sydney), managed by ASM Global, has…

kid infront of computer screen kid infront of computer screen

UNMC’s Munroe-Meyer Institute introduces autism diagnostic tool

The UNMC Munroe-Meyer Institute is piloting a new diagnostic tool…

Hussein Alawieh, a graduate student in Dr. José del R. Millán's lab, wears a cap packed with electrodes that is hooked up to a computer. The electrodes gather data by measuring electrical signals from the brain, and the decoder interprets that information and translates it into game action. Hussein Alawieh, a graduate student in Dr. José del R. Millán's lab, wears a cap packed with electrodes that is hooked up to a computer. The electrodes gather data by measuring electrical signals from the brain, and the decoder interprets that information and translates it into game action.

Universal brain-computer interface enables thought-controlled gaming

Imagine playing a racing game like Mario Kart, using only…