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College introduces online master program for assistive technology

Doing University Assignment with friend online

The Tseng College at California State University, Northridge has introduced a revamped online master’s of science program in assistive technology engineering (ATE) for the spring semester of 2021.

Assistive technology devices or apparatuses are primarily developed for the elderly and people with disabilities to improve their quality of life and independence. Assistive devices include hearing aids, prosthetics, text-to-speech software and closed captions.

“If you think about it from a broad perspective, everybody uses assistive technology,” assistive technology engineer professor Dale Conner said. “Whether it’s a ramp, curb cuts or the touch screens on your phone, they help everybody.”

The completely online program trains students to design assistive technology tools and was transformed from an on-campus program to meet the needs of working adults and to reach a larger audience.

“The online program really enables us to broaden our reach by bringing in a diverse group of students from across the country that are focused on common academic and career interests,” said Jesse Knepper, program manager for the Tseng College.

The online master’s program will provide students with hands-on experience that will help build their portfolios to share with prospective employers. Students will work with engineers to learn how to design and develop new assistive technology products, expand their technical abilities and identify new uses for existing assistive technologies.

Applications for the spring 2021 cohort will be accepted from Feb.13 through Nov.17, 2020.

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