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New website geared toward people with hearing disabilities

People with hearing disabilities can learn more about assistive technology, communications access and other issues at a new website launched recently by the Minnesota Department of Human Services.

The site is designed for people who are deaf, hard of hearing, deafblind and late-deafened; people experiencing age-related hearing loss; and people who live, work and provide services to people with hearing loss. It features captioned videos in American Sign Language, or ASL, and English. Funding comes from a special legislative appropriation approved in 2017.

“This website will help all Minnesotans affected by hearing loss,” said Interim Assistant Commissioner Stacy Twite. “We hope they’ll bookmark the site and come back to it when they need information.”

Videos focus on issues such as the Telephone Equipment Distribution program and how to connect with experienced DHS staff. The DHS Deaf and Hard of Hearing Division can be reached at 1-800-657-3663 voice, 651-964-1514 videophone, or email dhs.dhhsd@state.mn.us. The URL for the website is www.mn.gov/deaf-hard-of-hearing.

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