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IoT partnership to support people with learning disabilities

People with disabilities using tablet
Photo: Mencap

UK – A pioneering initiative connecting supported living homes using IoT technology has been launched by Vodafone, through Vodafone Business Ventures and Mencap, the UK’s leading learning disability charity.

The innovative Connected Living project uses technology to enhance the quality of life for people with learning disabilities, as well as providing support workers with complimentary tools to use in providing personalized care.

Co-designed by Vodafone, support workers and people with learning disabilities living in Mencap’s supported living services, Connected Living was piloted successfully over 12 months in locations across Hampshire, Sussex, Somerset, Cornwall, Leicestershire, Nottinghamshire and Suffolk. The collaborative partnership has involved people with a learning disability and support workers and service managers. It combines Vodafone’s expertise in IoT and connectivity with Mencap’s experience of improving the quality of life for people with a learning disability.

The pilot focused on how to make everyday activities – such as household tasks, time planning and socialising – easier. Technologies, including a range of user friendly, intuitive IoT enabled devices were installed in Mencap Supported Living homes controlled by a bespoke app, called Vodafone MyLife. Unlike standalone devices including GPS trackers or fall detectors, the MyLife app offers a simple user interface that is integrated and accessible via a single tablet. It gives Mencap’s clients control of their smart devices, while also enabling their support workers to have remote access. In addition, the Vodafone MyLife app allows users to create visual guides for everyday tasks and a host of other features

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